Scotland: Five things we learnt v Wales

first_imgTipping point: Greig Laidlaw parries the ball to team-mate SeymourDepth is still the main issueDuring the World Cup, Scotland were stuttering, but able to maintain a high level of performance right through the full 80 minutes. The reason? Better depth on the bench. Last week we saw the issues in the second half against England and again there was a poor period mid second half when the game was taken away from them. When a team is well in the game – not just hanging on, but in fact leading after an hour – the bench should be consolidating that position, rather than tired or over-eager players making unforced errors.Unfortunately the opposite happened: while Scotland needed to up the tempo it was the Welsh that started running riot – George North’s try being the prime example.The scrum is one of the key areas where Scotland suffer in the late periods of the game, when either the replacements came on and dropped balls (Gordon Reid) or they weren’t used (in the case of Zander Fagerson) and left WP Nel showing visible physical and mental fatigue as he played the full 80.Changes can be madeWith that in mind Scotland need a stronger bench, and Vern Cotter could drop one or two of the incumbents and look for them to make an impact as a substitute to earn their place back. With the lineout stuttering and Ross Ford missing in the loose for a second week, he would be top of the list and would in fact make a very good impact sub with Stuart McInally given a chance to start.Looking for change: Should Vern Cotter switch-up his bench for Italy?Tom Brown of Edinburgh is also in fine fettle as a winger and could be called up to the squad, as could one or other of the Toolis brothers who are also going well for Edinburgh. If Josh Strauss plays well this week for Glasgow he or Rob Harley could come in to back-row contention – John Barclay and John Hardie are both playing very well but are not big ball carriers and David Denton is another who has yet to set the heather alight. It is telling that Stuart Hogg was our top carrier in metres made and he went off after 25 minutes. That, at least, was more like itWe can debate the interpretations of Law 11 (dealing with offside) until the cows come home, but until another unlikely ruling from World Rugby confirming Scotland were hard done by, their fans have to console themselves with a vastly improved performance from the team – but yet another loss. It was about what was expected; there was no doubt that Scotland could raise their level of performance and answer their critics after last week, but beating Wales in Cardiff was always going to be a huge ask at a venue with no successes since 2002.For about an hour it was a perfectly good test match, with both teams playing at a high tempo and intensity level. Then the Scotrot (I’m trade-marking that) set in once again, and two simple tries later Scotland were out of the hunt.Taylor is up to the job but needs more ballDuncan Taylor put in a solid defensive performance, including an important tackle on Tom James that prevented a certain try. However he really had one carry of note, that he turned into an individual try. I don’t think the player himself is at fault, as Matt Scott the week before was also excellent in defence but had very few chances to do the direct ball carrying both men specialise in. Our pattern of attacking play, when not quick one-out ball to ambling forwards, seems to revolve around quick ball to Finn Russell aimed at putting the fullback and wings into play quickly in the midfield and wide channels.Needing more ball: Duncan Taylor did a fine jobWe have a choice of those strong runners at 12 and the talented Mark Bennett at 13 but over the last two weeks the centres have been used largely as decoys. New attack coach Jason O’Halloran should be making more use of the talent in midfield (Bennett had a better, but quiet game again) to keep the Italian defence guessing.Taylor should start against Italy, but give him something to do other than tackle.When Greig gets going, Scotland look a lot more effectiveWith Greig Laidlaw varying his point of attack and choosing to offer a running threat himself, the space opens up for everyone else in his backline. Admittedly he still crabs sideways a bit too much which shuts it right down again, but the Welsh defence had to do a lot more scrambling than England‘s did as the Scots found space in behind. When the pace (and presumably the players) flagged in the middle of the second half suddenly everything became that much easier for the men in red to defend. Sam Hidalgo-Clyne brought a return to the increased tempo that Scotland absolutely need to play with when he came on, but by then the damage was done. That he hasn’t had more chances is a reflection either on his poor club form or on Scotland’s depth on the bench. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Although some of the problems might be as a result of players missing through injury, there are about to be options for the Scotland management too with talk from Cotter that Peter Horne, Sean Maitland, Tim Visser, Matt Scott and even Grant Gilchrist could come into consideration for the Italy game.It’s not all doom and gloom, and if Scotland play like they did against Wales with a better bench they should beat Italy, but Cotter needs to be wary of being drawn into a dogfight between two sides desperate for a win. Jump and shout: Tommy Seymour catches the ball before scoring a try last_img read more

Adam Jones

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: The Greatest Players Adam Jones was christened ‘Bomb’ in a fond reference to 1990s American wrestler Adam Bomb, who sported similarly curly locks and an identical Christian name.However, the moniker took on another dimension when Wales’s longest-serving front-rower was at his peak. Destructive scrummaging rendered him a saboteur capable of obliterating opposition set-piece. Nowhere was this better demonstrated than over the first six months of 2013 prior to the introduction of new engagement laws.On 16 March, England arrived at a raucous Millennium Stadium with designs on a Grand Slam. Runaway flanker Justin Tipuric created two headline-grabbing tries, but Jones dominated the tight exchanges to garner a succession of penalties. Amid an atmosphere heady with emotion, Stuart Lancaster’s side subsided to a 30-3 defeat. They left the Six Nations trophy on the west of the Severn Bridge.That summer, Australia’s front row was comprehensively undone by a Lions scrum spearheaded by Jones and Alex Corbisiero in all three Tests.The successful series decider brought Bomb’s international roll of honour to four Six Nations titles, including three Grand Slams, and five Lions caps – the first of which, as a second-half replacement at Durban in 2009, saw Springbok loosehead Tendai ‘Beast’ Mtawarira shackled at Durban after he had turned Phil Vickery inside out. Major teams: Neath, Ospreys, Cardiff Blues, Harlequins
Country: Wales

Test span: 2003-2014
Wales caps: 95 (84 starts)

Lions caps: 5 (4 starts)

Test points: 10 (2T)center_img Four domestic crowns in an 11-season stint with Ospreys underlined Jones’s class, though things were not always straightforward. In the 2003 World Cup quarter-final against England he lasted 27 minutes before being hauled off – a shock he would later admit forced him to confront early-career fitness issues.Following a decade saturated with silverware, Jones’s 100th Test against South Africa in June 2014 brought a sad symmetry as Warren Gatland replaced him on the half-hour mark.Exclusion from the 2015 Six Nations squad hastened his international retirement but the most affable of props joined Harlequins to begin a new chapter. On announcing the signing, Conor O’Shea revealed he had received a text from Joe Marler. The victim of Jones’s formidable performance in Cardiff two years previously had simply written: “Glad he’s on my side now.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Six Nations: The 37-man Lions squad for New Zealand

first_imgDangerous: Rhys Webb is a threat around the fringesProps: Mako Vunipola (England), Joe Marler (England), Jack McGrath (Ireland), Dan Cole (England), Tadhg Furlong (Ireland), Kyle Sinckler (England)Pick the bones out of this little lot for the Test starters. Marler has been re-born since his difficulties in the 2016 Six Nations, Vunipola has the skill-set to play in the centre, and his finding his feet after an injury lay-off and Cole is another been-there-and-done-that merchant. Furlong is probably front-runner for the tight-head Test spot, but Cole will push him hard and a tour like this could be the making of Sinckler from Eddie Jones’ stand-point. He will also have his mentor at Harlequins, Graham Rowntree, on the trip and the scrum guru rates Sinckler massively as does Adam Jones. He is spiky all right – just what you need in New Zealand where every midweek team will be primed to soften up the Lions ahead of the Tests.Bedrock: Tadhg Furlong is expected to lock down the Lions scrumHookers: Rory Best (Ireland), Ken Owens (Wales), Jamie George (England)Four into three won’t go and this is one of the hardest areas for Gatland to pick. Owens had a wail of time in the Six Nations, Best showed up in Ireland’s game against England and George might just be the best of the lot. This is tough on Dylan Hartley who probably won’t appreciate the summer off but George is the coming man.In the loose: Jamie George has a solid set-piece and high workrateSecond row:  Joe Launchbury (England), Alun Wyn Jones (Wales), Courtney Lawes (England), Jonny Gray (Scotland), Maro Itoje (England), George Kruis (England)Gatland name-checked Kruis in an interview on the BBC last weekend even though the Saracens man did not feature in the Six Nations because of injury. He can run a line-out and the Lions will need that in every game down under. Launchbury and Lawes were the standout pairing in the tournament and Lawes and Itoje can both do a shift at six.Engine room: Jonny Gray’s remarkable tackle count would be an asset to the LionsBack row: Sam Warburton (Wales), Peter O’Mahony (Ireland), CJ Stander (Ireland), James Haskell (England), Billy Vunipola (England), Taulupe Faletau (Wales) Inked-in: Owen Farrell is likely to play at No 10 or No 12 for the Test team Everyone else has had a crack at predicting Warren Gatland’s party and Test line-ups for the British & Irish Lions tour to New Zealand this summer so why can’t we? Last time in Australia Gatland picked 37 players in his original selection and he is likely to do the same this time when he unveils the names on 19 April. There are some top players likely to miss out and maybe he should go down the Clive Woodward route – his first squad, in 2005, had 44 players in it and he called up seven replacements. But we will stick with the Gatland model and good luck to him when he tries to whittle this lot down to 15 Test starters. That is why he gets the big bucks and he will get stick whoever he picks – and there is a case for about 50 players – we are sure we will too. Now where is that tin hat?Full-backs/wings: Stuart Hogg (Scotland), Elliot Daly (England), George North (Wales), Liam Williams (Wales), Rob Kearney (Ireland), Tommy Seymour (Scotland), Anthony Watson (England)Versatility is the name of the game here with numbers tight so Watson and Williams who can play wing or 15 get the nod as does Daly who can also play centre. Rob Kearney is picked for his ability under the high ball and there are plenty of finishers in there. Halfway through the Six Nations North would not have got in but he has found himself again and he is big bloke. That all leaves Leigh Halfpenny and Jack Nowell as the next cabs off the rank if anyone falls over, they will so that pair should not go too far on holiday.Finisher: Tommy Seymour has given Scotland a cutting edge out wideCentres: Owen Farrell (England), Jonathan Joseph (England), Robbie Henshaw (Ireland), Jonathan Davies (Wales)Owen Farrell is a certainty for the Tests if fit, whether at 10 or 12, Joseph is one of the best finishers around – a fact that masks his ability in defence where he has come on a ton. Davies has been there and done it despite blotting his copybook against England in the Six Nations and Henshaw, another who had a faux-pas in the tournament gets in….just. He has played 12 and 13 at Test level.Midfield muscle: Robbie Henshaw has the quality to thrive in New ZealandFly-halves: Johnny Sexton (Ireland), George Ford (England)Johnny Sexton was back to his best in Ireland’s game against England – he absolutely bossed it – but if he thought he was targeted by the English then he will get it with knobs in New Zealand. He knows it is coming and he is good enough to deal with it. Ford just edges Finn Russell out of the tour and there is always Farrell to provide cover at 10.Vision: George Ford offers a point of difference to Owen Farrell and Johnny SextonScrum-halves: Rhys Webb (Wales), Conor Murray (Ireland), Ben Youngs (England)Conor Murray and Rhys Webb look like slugging it out for the Test No.9 jersey with the Irishman favourite to nail it at the moment not least because of his partnership with Sexton. Youngs started the second Test in Australia in 2013, having come off the bench in the first, and knows a bit about the Irish fly-half as well. Greig Laidlaw’s injury in Scotland’s game against France has done him no favours on the Lions front. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The dust has just settled on an explosive Six Nations which means the eyes of the rugby world will focus squarely on the April 19 Lions squad announcement. Who gets in? Sam Warburton is back to his best form and O’Mahony gets in on the back of a huge game against England. He is abrasive, good in the line-out and you can see the Kiwi fans taking to his no-nonsense approach. Haskell told us once that the nearest he had got to the Lions was Longleat but he is a good tourist, which is what Gatland is looking for in his last four or five spots, and could easily be midweek captain. Ian McGeechan lamented the absence of a strong character to captain the dirt-trackers in 1993 – Haskell could be the man. And don’t bet against him playing a Test.Class is permanent: Taulupe Faletau is just back from injurylast_img read more

Six Nations Round Three Talking Points

first_img Overtime: Cory Hill scores after Wales’ 34 phases (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Discipline and defence crucial to Wales’ win over EnglandLast year at Twickenham, Wales conceded just two penalties in their Six Nations defeat by England. This weekend it was three penalties in the Principality Stadium – and that disciplined approach was crucial to their 21-13 victory.Wales didn’t allow England to clear their lines and dominate the territory statistics by infringing. They kept on the right side of the referee and kept the pressure on the visitors, who themselves conceded nine penalties.The patience they showed in the 34-phase move that led to Cory Hill’s decisive try was exceptional, not only varying the plays – pick-and-goes, wide balls, miss-passes – but maintaining their discipline. So often you see teams give away a penalty in those situations.Double hit: Billy Vunipola is tackled by Josh Adams and Hadleigh Parkes (Getty Images)Wales’ defence was also key. Their tackle stats were not as high as England’s. They made 127 tackles to England’s 205, with the visitors’ top tacklers making nearly twice as many tackles as Wales – Jamie George and Tom Curry made 27 tackles to Alun Wyn Jones’s 14.However, Wales closed down England’s big ball-carriers effectively, often with double tackles, and that prevented Eddie Jones’s side from gaining momentum and building attacks.Should England have gone to the bench earlier? Momentum started to slip away from England midway through the second half in Cardiff. Eddie Jones replaced a couple of forwards around that point, but what about changing the dynamic of the game?Owen Farrell is a world-class player but he had something of an off-day against Wales. Why not bring George Ford on, move Farrell to 12 and present Wales with a different challenge, two playmaking options to keep the defenders busy – even three if you include Henry Slade?Reined in: George Ford and Dan Robson were kept on the bench in Cardiff (Getty Images)Ben Youngs kicked an awful lot from scrum-half. Would Dan Robson’s sniping game and pace have made a difference in the final quarter?We’ll obviously never know but Jones’s reluctance to go to the bench seemed strange. Surely those ‘finishers’ could have helped change the course of the match?Personal attacks are not necessaryWarren Gatland described Kyle Sinckler as an “emotional timebomb” in the build-up to Wales v England and talked about the England prop having “demons” to deal with in his post-match press conference.Singled out: Kyle Sinckler looks dejected at the end of the match (Getty Images)Last year it was Eddie Jones singling out Rhys Patchell and a few years back the England coach got personal about Johnny Sexton.Yes, this is professional sport and mind games are becoming more prevalent, but it doesn’t need to involve targeting individuals and getting personal in this way.Gatland had no problem picking Sinckler for the Lions Test team that faced New Zealand in 2017 after all.French kids are alrightFinally, France performed for a full 80 minutes. In beating Scotland they replicated their first-half performance against Wales but managed to maintain it for the whole match.And central to the victory were a group of youngsters given licence to play their game. Romain Ntamack belied his teenage years and looked at home in the No 10 shirt. Demba Bamba replicated his Junior World Cup form with a physical performance. Thomas Ramos was superb from full-back, with his counter-attacking runs causing the Scots plenty of problems. Given the laughter you can hear, it’s unlikely the trip unsettled any players before the Test match, but their performance was below-par. Fine nine: Antoine Dupont bursts clear for France against Scotland (Getty Images)And Antoine Dupont bossed the show from scrum-half, proving that he is the fulcrum upon which this France team should be built.Related: Romain Ntamack scores sensational tryAs for Yoann Huget, one of the older members of the squad, his mixed championship continues. There was the try followed by the defensive howler against Wales, the dreadful performance at full-back against England, and now another varied show against Scotland, which included a sin-binning and a try.Scotland still lack depthScotland’s first-choice XV is a good side. There’s no doubting that. However, strip away a few key players and it makes a vast difference to their quality. That’s what we witnessed in Paris.Without their X-factor men Finn Russell and Stuart Hogg, as well as key forwards WP Nel, Hamish Watson and Ryan Wilson, Scotland struggled against France, eventually losing 27-10.Had those players been on the Stade de France pitch, Scotland would have had a great chance of ending their 20-year losing streak in Paris. And those are just five players who feature on a double-digit injury list for the Scots.Russell should be back to face Wales and Gregor Townsend will be hoping Hogg is too, for they will need them to challenge the current table-toppers.Townsend will also be desperate to develop more strength in depth so Scotland don’t feel the loss of key players so acutely. Yet having only two pro teams in Scotland makes the challenge that much harder.Ireland’s entertaining bus journeyBefore Ireland’s nervy 26-16 victory over Italy in Rome, a video emerged on social media of the team’s bus journey to the stadium – and it made comical viewing.Ireland had a police escort to Stadio Olimpico, which involved a single police car leading the way. Said car weaved left and right, cleared traffic, gesticulated wildly at other cars – and had the players and coaches in fits of giggles.You can watch the video clip of the bus journey here… From discipline to Dupont, we round up the key news items from the third round of the 2019 championship With France showing vast improvement in their win over Scotland, the Irish need to up their game before round four too.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

James Haskell Announces Retirement

first_img“Not only a superb player, but also one of the game’s great characters; rugby will be poorer without the ‘old fella’.”Below are a collection of responses we found on social media. Many of Haskell’s former teammates and rugby contemporaries were quick to comment upon hearing the news.England head-coach Eddie Jones said: “When I look back at my time coaching James, it will always bring a smile to my face.“It was a privilege to coach him, but also great fun. He’s what I’d describe as a ‘glue’ player – someone who always tries to bring a squad together. Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Congrats @jameshaskell on a hell of a shift mate! Enjoyed playing with & against you even with your terrible chat but you’ve put a smile on people’s faces! I’m sure you’ll be as relentless & successful in retirement! 1 in 10 of your gags are funny so persistence beats resistance!— Andy Goode (@AndyGoode10) May 7, 2019 James Haskell Announces RetirementEngland international and former British & Irish Lion James Haskell has announced he will retire at the end of the season due to a series of ankle and toe injuries.A player with a storied career and a fan favourite for his no-nonsense approach to the game and to a similar extent, his punditry, Haskell earned 77 caps for his country, played in two Rugby World Cups and won three Six Nations titles, including a Grand Slam in 2016.He also represented the Lions four times in 2017 during the tour to New Zealand.“I have loved every minute of my career in rugby and feel very privileged to have played with and against some exceptional players,” said Haskell.“There are so many people to thank, but in particular I would like to express my appreciation for all the coaches, trainers and physios who I have worked with throughout my career – from Maidenhead minis all the way up to England and the British & Irish Lions, I owe them all a huge debt of gratitude.“I also want to thank all my team mates over the years for putting up with me and giving me an adventure that allowed me to laugh every single day.“Retiring is obviously a really difficult decision for me to make; professional rugby has been the centre of my life for such a long time now and while it’s weird to imagine living without it, I look to the future with huge excitement.“I look back at my career and have been very lucky to have done most things there are to do in rugby. Sadly, I will never know what it’s like to win a World Cup or represent the Barbarians.“Finally, I would not have achieved what I have in this sport without the continued support of my amazing wife, my family, and my friends. To them all, I am incredibly grateful.”center_img Retiring at the end of the season, see how the rugby world reacted to the news here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Keeping the dream

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 17, 2012 at 12:35 pm St. Andrew’s in Amarillo, Texas, joined forces with St. John Baptist Church for our fourth annual Afro-Centric Choral Evensong. Afterward we enjoyed a meal together. More info on our website and on our Facebook page — St. Andrew’s Amarillo. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is located in West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., southwest of the National Mall, opened to the public on Aug. 22, 2011, after more than two decades of planning, fund-raising and construction. Photo/National Park Service[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians across the nation are bolstering their Jan. 16 celebrations of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by adding deeds to words, service to song.A day camp at St. John’s Church in North Haven, Connecticut, aims to illustrate for young and old that Jan. 16 is no ordinary holiday, but an opportunity to pair fun and games with community reflection, collaboration and service.In Savannah, Georgia, laity and clergy, children and adults alike, will march as the  St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church choir joins those from other churches to belt out gospel tunes from atop a parade float.After a Sunday evening “lock-in” at Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, about 90 youth will join a parade and conclude the day painting, pruning, packing, planting and praying at a variety of local mission projects.Participants at a Trinity Church in Belleville, Michigan, service will re-enact a freedom march and recall some of the “unsung” heroes of the civil rights movement.The Peace Fellowship of St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Church, Freeland, on Whidbey Island, about 25 miles north of Seattle, is commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Riders, ordinary people who in 1961 rode buses from the north to the south to challenge segregated public transportation.In Tonawanda, New York, at the diocesan center, Diocese of Western New York Bishop William Franklin and other local Episcopalians will share personal stories of challenging racial prejudice.And the list goes on and on.Such commemorations keep alive King’s dream of equality and opportunity, and help the nation inch toward its full realization, participants said. King, a prominent leader of the civil rights movement and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, was assassinated April 4, 1968, at age 39 in Memphis, where he’d gone to support striking sanitation workers. A federal holiday commemorating his birthday on the third Monday in January was signed into law in 1983 and first observed in 1986. Some states initially resisted; the holiday was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000.Connecticut day camp hopes to teach, inspire, collaborateAbout 45 children have already registered for St. John’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Camp and Michele Kearney, director of children and youth ministries, was expecting that number to nearly double by Monday, she said in a Jan. 11 telephone interview from the North Haven church.The camp — a first for the church — is a community collaboration between the local clergy association, schools and the town of North Haven, and combines both educational and service opportunities, she said.Retired teachers and older youth will assist as children aged four through fifth grade participate in music, stories and poetry, drama, games, arts, crafts and other entertainment focused on telling the story of King and the civil rights movement.“Since so many parents have to work on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and schools are not in session, the clergy association wanted to honor Dr. King’s legacy by taking the opportunity to enhance our children’s knowledge of Dr. King’s life and work,” said the Rev. Matthew Lincoln, St. John’s rector. “We hope this day camp will exemplify the kind of community collaboration that Dr. King valued.”Kearney agreed, adding that the camp seeks to offer opportunities for students so the holiday is more “than just another day off school with no meaning.”“It just seems like we have such an important day, a day that is so important to our country that … it’s important to reach out as a community and help each other realize the importance of the day. This is a day to celebrate.”‘Freed’ for mission and serviceUpon being “freed” after a Jan. 15 overnight lock-in at San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral, some 90 youth from across the Diocese of California will participate in one of four local mission projects, according to Jennifer Snow, diocesan associate for discipleship ministries.“This is the first year we are including a mission component,” Snow said in a Jan. 12 e-mail to ENS. The program, which includes participation from “a sizeable Methodist contingent” is intended to combine “fun, friendship and creative celebration with deepening faith” as well as connecting spirituality to justice, she added.“Late Sunday night in the Cathedral we will celebrate a unique liturgy centered around the lives of people like Martin Luther King, Jr., who have worked for justice among all people. On Monday morning we will wake up to march in the King parade. That afternoon we offer ourselves for mission and service,” Snow said. “It roots us in the past and moves us to the present and future, from reflection to action.”The youth can opt to participate in: a YMCA Gardening Project; join a sidewalk mural painting project showing that certain city streets are routes children often walk; help to pack and deliver groceries from the City Impact Food Bank; or help to paint St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church, an historically African American church in San Francisco.Singing for King: same fight, different roundBetween video excerpts of King’s speeches, a choir of Episcopalians and others within the Diocese of Georgia will belt out gospel music from the lead float in the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Parade through Savannah, according to A.L. Addington, a coordinator for the Jan. 16 event.“It’ll be a lot of contemporary gospel music. And some Mahalia Jackson,” he added.The evening before, local youth will join a lock-in at St. Matthew’s, according to the Rev. Cheryl Parris, rector.“Each year, the youth of our convocation gather together the Sunday evening before the parade to reflect on the life and ministry of Dr. King,” she said. “We have heartfelt discussions about where we have come.”Parris, who’ll be among hundreds marching alongside the float, said it’s the first time in the parade’s 33-year history that there will be an Episcopal float. “We’ve always participated — the church and the diocese” but not with a float, which will be among 300 others.Events like the King Day parade “are visible reminders to us about where we are and where we are not in terms of race relations overall,” she added. “As citizens and as Christians, we need these events as reminders that we are, at best, at the end of the beginning of this struggle. We are in a different round of the same fight.”Peacemaking and freedom ridersSt. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Church in western Washington state, is hosting “Blessed be the Peace Makers” a program featuring Ora Houston, a member of St. James Church in Austin, Texas, a deputy to General Convention and an active leader in the Union of Black Episcopalians.Program coordinator Dick Hall said “we thought it was important to offer it to the community. We need to honor nonviolent activism and change.”Hall, a retired teacher, said that efforts were made to involve youth “because we don’t want them to forget what sacrifices were made. It’s really America’s original sin, slavery. We’re still dealing with racism, and white privilege and we still need to remind people of that,” he said.And to remind young people about nonviolent alternatives, he added. “Youth today get a lot of advertising toward military and how to use force to solve problems. It’s really important that we put forth a different avenue, a different alternative and it’s really appropriate that we do it in a church because, bottom line, this was a church-based movement. It came out of the church and faith-based motivation.”Incorporating the freedom riders, who were black and white and who challenged segregation in public transportation by making bus trips to the south in 1961, is also important, Hall believes.“It says a lot about nonviolence in the face of violence, about how redemptive nonviolence brings about real change rather than violence reacting to violence.”Similarly, the program at Trinity Church in Belleville will also feature some unsung heroes of the civil rights movement during “The Dream Lives On,” program Jan. 16, said the Rev. John Hagan, rector.They’ll also simulate a freedom march, carrying signs and singing protest songs, and welcome a local drama group, the Freedom Players, who will deliver excerpts from some of King’s speeches and offer civil rights-era music followed by a discussion.“It’s important to commemorate Dr. King,” Hagan said in a Jan. 11 interview from his office. “He was a real hero and we want to celebrate that.”Youth throughout the Diocese of Western New York will gather for “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” as a local unsung hero, Thomas Ashford, describes challenges he faced while trying to join St. Peter’s Church in Niagara Falls in 1950.Bishop Franklin will also describe, via videotaped message, how his grandmother influenced him by daring to invite African Americans to her Mississippi home during the tumultuous civil rights era, said Laurie Wozniak, diocesan communication officer, in an e-mail to ENS.Ashford, 81, recalled during a Jan. 11 telephone interview that although at the time he was a Methodist in good standing, after one visit in 1950 he decided St. Peter’s was the church for him. But it took parishioners a few years to agree.It happened back in the day when ladies wore hats and gloves to church and men dressed up in suits and ties and Florsheim shoes, and when African Americans who showed up at white churches were routinely sent to one of the local black churches, he said.When he requested a sponsor for confirmation Ashford, an auto mechanic, recalls being told “there’s a black Methodist church and there’s a black Baptist church and St. Philip’s in Buffalo.”“I said, but I want to be a member of St. Peter’s. It’s the only place I want to go. They just didn’t want any blacks there, but I was not going to leave. I was going to stay there, so I stayed there and stuck it out,” he said. At one point he was even told “Hell would freeze over” before he’d be accepted as a member, he recalled.“But I said that ‘I don’t think so. It’s God’s church. They don’t own the church.”In 1952, he was confirmed and has been active ever since, introducing other family members to the church. He still works three days a week at a local machine shop, serves as junior warden and along with his wife helped organize a couple’s ministry.“Now, St. Peter’s is wonderful, I wouldn’t want to be in any other parish,” he said. “I’m not just a number — all of us at St. Peter’s are a family.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Keeping the dream Episcopalians honor Martin Luther King Jr. through service and song TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By Pat McCaughanPosted Jan 13, 2012 center_img Comments are closed. Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Barbara Whitton says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (1) last_img read more

Hero of Camping awards presented to Schori, Jefferts Schori

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention 2012, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Hero of Camping awards presented to Schori, Jefferts Schori Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Natalie Weir, Waycross board of directors chair, center, presented Richard Schori, and Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori with the Heroes of Camping Award July 8 during Indianapolis Day festivities at Victory Field. Photo/Hannah Wilder.[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers July 8 presented Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and her husband, Richard Schori, with Hero of Camping Ministry awards for their contributions to the Episcopal camping world.Not only are they outdoor enthusiasts, but Jefferts Schori and Schori also support ECCC’s mission to sustain and enhance the ministry of all camps and conference centers of the Episcopal Church.Amidst Indianapolis Day festivities in Victory Field, which included samba dancing and carnival games, Jefferts Schori and Schori both received the triennial award, which honors those who have supported the ministry of Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers through personal involvement. Schori is a former board member and Jefferts Schori was the first presiding bishop to be the keynote speaker at ECCC’s annual conference in Mississippi in 2009. She has been supportive of ECCC’s mission throughout her episcopate, and has visited many camps and conference centers.Waycross Board of Directors Chair Natalie Weir and Peg Smith, chief executive officer of the American Camp Association, presented Schori and Jefferts Schori with the glass, rock-like awards.Weir’s 40-year involvement in Waycross, the camp and conference center in the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis, has shown her the “transformative impact that a community of unconditional love, centered in the beauty of creation has in people’s lives,” she said. She recognized the presiding bishop for understanding “the formational role that camps and conference centers play in the spiritual formation and leadership development of youth, young adults, and the young at heart throughout the church and the world.”In honor of the award ceremony, hundreds turned out in T-shirts from their own Episcopal camps and conference centers.“As we look around the stadium at all the folks who are wearing their camp or conference center T-shirt, we can see that campers are leaders in the church, and the work we are doing at our camps and conference centers really is changing the world,” said Weir.“We also understand that spending time in God’s creation, even on a very hot day like today, has a profound impact on our ability to understand and address the complex issues we face daily in our lives as we do the work God has given us to do, in our workplaces, our communities and the world.”In presenting the award to Schori, Weir said, “you have left your handprint on the hearts of many through your efforts to ensure no Episcopalians are left inside.” A former college athlete, Schori is a highly skilled mountain climber and has made a solo, un-roped ascent of the Matterhorn, climbed Mt. McKinley and other lofty peaks.Weir recognized the presiding bishop for her efforts in placing a priority on leadership development for youth and young adults alike. A trained oceanographer, the presiding bishop has always displayed her love of the outdoors, and respect for God’s creation. The award given to the presiding bishop read, “in recognition of her vision and lifelong commitment as educator, priest, bishop and presiding bishop to the training of generations of young leaders who are transforming the world.”The Hero of Camping Ministry Award is the brainchild of the ECCC board of directors and Executive Director Canon Peter Bergstrom. In an address to the House of Bishops July 7, Bergstrom said, “summer camp is more important today than ever, as so many children spend most of their waking hours indoors in front of one screen or another. Direct connection to nature, to God’s creation, is important in so many ways, as is really living together with other children from a variety of ethnicities and economic backgrounds.”Canon Bergstrom said that Schori and Jefferts Schori understand that summer camp, combined with flourishing parish youth groups, provide vital experiences that form loving and caring Christians and life-long Episcopalians.“It is a pleasure to honor them,” said Bergstrom. “We’re grateful for leaders who understand the connection between Episcopal camps and conference centers and the future of our church.”During General Convention in 2009, ECCC honored the Rt. Rev. M. Thomas Shaw, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, with the Hero of Camping Ministry Award.The House of Bishops recognized Canon Bergstrom July 7 for his 40 years of service to Camp Stevens, the Episcopal camp in the Diocese of Los Angeles and San Diego. He retires this summer from his responsibilities as executive director, but will continue his leadership of ECCC.Smith, who is an executive at the American Camp Association, a national organization representing more than 7,000 individual members and more than 2,400 ACA-Accredited® camps, spoke about the role that leaders in the faith community have, and their responsibility to enrich lives through the camp experience. She noted the connection between spirituality and nature, saying, “many people have their first encounter with spirituality in the outdoors so when I see these two things together – spirituality and nature – it gives me hope.”She recognized Schori and Jefferts Schori for their lifetime achievement award and then addressed the audience: “You are all heroes. You have influence as leaders of the church. Use it well.”— Hannah Wilder is communcations director for the Diocese of San Diego. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention, Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Hannah WilderPosted Jul 9, 2012 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

Two thousand South Sudanese Christians confirmed in just eight days

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Sudan & South Sudan Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] More than 2000 people in the three archdeaconries of Tonj east area in Wau diocese of South Sudan were confirmed by the bishop during his recent trip around the diocese.The Rt. Rev. Moses Deng Bol told ACNS that the confirmations were done over eight days during a tour of his diocese that covers two out of the 10 states of South Sudan and measures more than 13,000 square kilometers (8078 square miles).“These are very serious Christians and most of the them are adults who have became Christians for the first time in their lives,” he said. “So they’re not just children of Christian parents.”The bishop disagreed with some religious educators who believe that by withholding confirmation until later in life, young people are kept involved in the life of the church for a longer period of time.He equated such teaching to holding young people captive in order for them to receive grace from God. “How do we justify this? This attitude surely has a negative impact on young people and their experience of God and church,” he said. “Is this the God we want them to know? One who withholds grace until we’ve jumped through all the hoops that our church tells us we have to jump through?”Deng said that children cannot be expected to have a positive memory or experience of the church or God later in their lives “if we keep dangling the sacrament over their heads like a carrot.”Deng said it was crucial for the newly confirmed to have “a very intensive discipleship to really understand what being a follower of Christ means in their daily lives.”However, he highlighted some of the challenges that the diocese faces in ministry, evangelizing and Christian teaching. “There are only 65 priests, most of whom have very little or no theological education at all,” he said. “This is the reason why my priority number one is theological training for priests and evangelists.”Deng also said despite the large numbers, they have enough churches for the new Christians. “We have sufficient churches [but] most of them are under-tree churches and others built out of mud and grass thatch.”The bishop also bemoaned the poor state of the roads saying it was a real challenge to access remote areas of his diocese. “The people confirmed in various parishes did not just come from that parish alone,” he revealed. “Many of them came from far away parishes and some of them had to walk for two days in order to come to the main parish where I was.”Deng said one benefit of embarking on such diocese-wide tours was that he was also able to undertake other tasks including training clergy, lay readers, Mothers’ Union leaders and evangelists.“During this period, I got to have meetings with the clergy because we don’t get to meet often due to long distances and lack of transport,” he said. “I also had a chance to dedicate two concrete church buildings that were constructed in partnership with Samaritan’s Purse.”The Episcopal Church of Sudan covers the two countries of Sudan and South Sudan. It comprises 28 dioceses that stretch many thousands of miles. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Africa, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Rector Washington, DC Two thousand South Sudanese Christians confirmed in just eight days Some people walked two days to take part in the service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Bellah ZuluPosted Jun 10, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Anglican Consultative Council to meet in Lusaka, Zambia in 2016

first_imgAnglican Consultative Council to meet in Lusaka, Zambia in 2016 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing The Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Lusaka, Zambia will host over 100 members of the Anglican Consultative Council for its 16th meeting next April. Photo: Lusaka Cathedral[Anglican Communion News Service] More than one hundred lay people, priests and bishops will gather next April in Zambia for the 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC).The Anglican Communion Standing Committee and the Church of the Province of Central Africa have started the preparations and consultation process for the next year’s meeting taking place in the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Lusaka, on April 8-20.The overarching theme for the meeting is to be “Intentional Discipleship in a World of Differences.” This is in response to the challenges facing the church today of articulating our faith in a way that can apply it to Christian ethics in all spheres of life. The theme was commended by the archbishop of Canterbury and approved in the recent meeting of the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion.A number of further priorities for the ACC agenda were identified earlier this year in Dublin in a consultation with provincial Secretaries who were representing various member churches of the Anglican Communion. Mission and evangelism, environment and climate change, refugees and migrants, reconciliation and difference are among the main topics identified in the consultation. The detailed ACC program is still being developed.The local launch of the ACC-16 will take place in a dedicated service in Lusaka Cathedral on Nov. 29 and will gather representatives from all the dioceses in the Province of Central Africa (Botswana, Malawi, Zimbabwe and Zambia). The Secretary General of the Anglican Communion, the Most Rev. Josiah Idowu-Fearon, will preach at the service and a video message from the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby will also be shown.The new logo designed for ACC-16 has as the central image the iconic shape of the roof of Lusaka Cathedral. The colors used in the image are all the colors in the flags of Botswana, Malawi, Zimbabwe and Zambia – the countries of the dioceses that make up the Church of the Province of Central Africa. The cross in the logo is in the style of the one over the nave altar in Lusaka Cathedral.The role of the ACC is to facilitate the cooperative work of the churches of the Anglican Communion, exchange information and help to co-ordinate common action. It advises on the organization and structures of the communion, and seeks to develop common policies with respect to the world mission of the church, including ecumenical matters.The Anglican Consultative Council is one of the four instruments of the Anglican Communion, together with the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primates Meeting and Lambeth Conference. It is the most representative bodies as it includes lay and ordained members. Each province, depending on its size, has one to three representatives.The Anglican Consultative council meets every three years in different parts of the world. There have been fifteen meetings of the Council. The last meeting, ACC-15, was held in Auckland New Zealand in 2012. November 3, 2015 at 2:40 pm IS THE TEC PRIMATE ATTENDING THIS MEETING?? Comments (2) November 3, 2015 at 2:52 pm Primates do not automatically attend ACC meetings. The Episcopal Church’s size entitles it to one bishop, one clergy person and one lay person. Its elected representatives are Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings and Rosalie Simmonds Ballentine of the Diocese of the Virgin Islands. 26th Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori attended ACC-14 and Acc-15 in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee. Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Posted Nov 3, 2015 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY ACC16, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ RA Garcia says: Rector Knoxville, TN Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Consultative Council Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Anglican Communion recognizes youth and children discipleship with new award

first_img Anglican Communion, Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Anglican Communion News Service] Successful and emerging discipleship work with and by children and young people within the Anglican Communion will be recognized with two new awards. The new Youth and Children Ministry Award will be presented for the first time at this year’s Anglican Consultative Council meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, in April.The new award is an initiative of Anglican Witness, a network supported by the mission department of the Anglican Communion Office. The Anglican Witness initiative brings together Anglicans and Episcopalians from across the Communion involved in a whole range of work to support evangelism and church growth in parishes, dioceses and provinces; and in recent years has focused its work around discipleship – equipping Christians to live their faith in everyday life as disciples of Jesus.The new award will be presented every three years at the meetings of the Anglican Consultative Council; and will recognise initiatives of Anglican youth ministries in their effort to effectively disciple young people under their care.The award will be presented in two categories. The first will focus on success or achievement – recognising successful work that has been done in promoting effective discipleship among young people especially with impact that can go beyond the project or programme itself. The selection panel will be looking for initiatives that have the potential to motivate, challenge and empower others.The recipient of the award will be invited to showcase the work they have done at the ACC meeting and it will be widely publicised within the Anglican Communion for others to be inspired and learn from it.The second category will be for emerging or promising work and will provide a cash award of up to £10,000 to fund a promising new, cutting edge, emerging initiative in youth or children discipleship with potential for local and wider impact. The actual amount of the award will vary and is dependent upon the needs of the initiative.Applications for this award will be open to any Anglican ministry in the participating region. The Anglican Communion’s secretary general will perform an initial sift and send shortlisted applications to a selection panel.Applications must demonstrate an understanding of the basics of the Christian faith as they are expressed in the programs; a clear demonstration of the ways of equipping young people for lifelong discipleship; a clear demonstration of the sustainability of the program; evidence of community contribution to the fulfilment of the program; and evidence of how the program has or would influence positive culture change and spiritual growth among the young people.For the purposes of these new awards, the provinces of the Anglican Communion have been placed into three regional groups: those in Africa – including the Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa from the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East; the Americas and Europe; and Asia and Australasia. For each ACC meeting, applications will be sought only from provinces in the same region as the host of the ACC meeting. So for this year’s ACC-16 meeting in Lusaka, applications are being sought only from the Diocese of Egypt and the provinces in Africa.If successive ACC meetings are in the same region; the secretary general would either pass the Award to the next region in line or retain it in the same region but not award it to a project in the same province that received the previous Award.The selection panel will be made up of not more than five people from the region hosting the ACC. Its broad membership will include a young person, a youth worker, a bishop and a lay person; and at least two people of each gender.Welcoming the “small but exciting initiative,” the secretary general of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, said: “I am personally very excited about the potential of this strategic initiative that will promote discipleship with and among children and young people.“They are a critical part of our Communion and I pray that this new award will help to recognize the work done by the many faithful people involved in working with children and young people within the Anglican Communion and also encourage others through sharing experience of what is working in other parts of the work.”The Rev. Canon John Kafwanka, director for mission at the Anglican Communion Office, added: “Considering that the majority of the national and church populations in many parts of the Communion – particularly in the continent of Africa and much of the Global South – are young people, this is a very exciting and important initiative, aimed at promoting discipleship and equipping of young Anglicans to be Christ’s Ambassadors and witnesses to his love for the world in their everyday life.“I am delighted to commend this initiative to all those who are able to take part apply.”Details of how to apply for this year’s Anglican Communion Youth and Children Ministry Award have been sent to provincial secretaries of the eligible Anglican churches. Tags Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Youth & Young Adults Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Nurya Love Parish says: Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Children, Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anglican Communion recognizes youth and children discipleship with new award Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staffPosted Feb 25, 2016 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC February 26, 2016 at 10:08 am What great news! I am so excited to learn from this process. Thank you for taking up this critical work. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more