OPDR Launching New CAVA Service

first_imgzoom German short sea shipping company Oldenburg-Portugiesische Dampfschiffs-Rhederei (OPDR), a subsidiary of CMA CGM, is to start on June 7 its new CAVA service that will connect the Spanish east coast with northern European ports, including Saint Petersburg. The new service is to link the two major Spanish ports Valencia and Cartagena to four of the main ports in northern Europe: Tilbury, Antwerp, Rotterdam, and Saint Petersburg.OPDR said it will start the new service in Valencia, followed by Cartagena, before it proceeds to the north the following day.The company will deploy six 1,800 TEU container vessels capable of carrying pallet-wide equipment on the service.On May 26, OPDR announced a revised AGAX service connecting northern Europe with Morocco, the Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands. The service now includes the port of Rouen, providing a direct connection between northern France and Morocco.The upgraded rotation shortens transit times from Rouen to Casablanca to four days. Three 700 TEU ships are deployed on the new AGAX service.last_img read more

Facebook may be slapped with a recordsetting fine from US regulators over

WASHINGTON – U.S. regulators have met to discuss imposing a record-setting fine against Facebook for violating a legally binding agreement with the government to protect the privacy of its users’ personal data, according to three people familiar with the deliberations but not authorized to speak on the record.The fine under consideration at the Federal Trade Commission, a privacy and security watchdog that began probing Facebook last year, would mark the first major punishment levied against Facebook in the United States since reports emerged in March that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy, accessed personal information on about 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge. Instagram’s digital ad share to double despite Facebook issues Mark Zuckerberg says he’s going outside his comfort zone in 2019 to host regular discussions on tech Samsung phone users get a shock: They can’t delete Facebook The penalty is expected to be much larger than the US$22.5 million fine the agency imposed on Google in 2012. That fine set a record for the greatest penalty for violating an agreement with the FTC to improve its privacy practices.The FTC’s exact findings in its Facebook investigation and the total amount of the fine, which the agency’s five commissioners have discussed at a private meeting in recent weeks, have not been finalized, two of the people said. Facebook also has talked with FTC staffers about the investigation, one of the people familiar with the probe said, but it is unclear whether the company would settle with the FTC by accepting a significant financial penalty.The FTC, which has been shut down amid the lapse in government funding, could not be reached for comment. FTC Chairman Joseph Simons did not respond to a request for comment. Facebook declined to comment.The Washington Post read more