SGO to Search for Unexploded Ordnance on Sunken Iraqi …

first_img Print  Close 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 zoom Sterling Global Operations (SGO) has been chosen to provide surface – supplied divers for unexploded ordnance search and removal and salvage operations for the sunken 82,000-ton VLCC (Very Large Crude Carrier) Amuriyah, an Iraqi tanker sunk near Bubiyan Island off the coast of Kuwait in Jan. 1991 during Operation Desert Storm.Special Diving Services (SDS) Holland hired SGO for this project.“For years SGO has conducted major demining and unexploded ordnance clearance projects in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other countries around the world,” said Matt Hulsey, SGO vice president of programs. “Now we’re doing this important work under the sea, an example of SGO’s versatility and ability.”Surface-supplied diving means air or breathing gas supplied via an umbilical from a surface vessel.The VLCC Amuriyah wreck, at an average depth of 33 meters, must be removed because it’s within the tanker turning circle of a future Single Mooring Point (SMP-5) at Iraq’s Al Basrah Oil Terminal, through which 97 percent of Iraq’s crude oil is shipped. The sunken vessel is blocking construction of a vital mooring point for the export of crude oil from SMP-5.Oil sales make up 95 percent of Iraqi government revenues, so anything – such as a sunken ship – that blocks additional oil exports must be removed.“Our employees will work under the supervision of SDS Holland to ensure that no unexploded ordnance remains on the ship or in the close proximity of the mooring point,” Hulsey said. “SDS Holland is known worldwide for its experience and capabilities. We’re delighted the company chose SGO to execute this project.”An on-site ship inspection by survey equipment and divers will assess the wreck’s position and condition. This will include the search and mitigation of any unexploded ordnance that may be within the ship.After the VLCC Amuriyah and surrounding area is cleared, plans are to raise and float the wreck, which is in two sections, away from the area. The ship will be salvaged.The entire project, from survey to re-floating, is expected to take 12 – 18 months. SGO, March 13, 2014 My locationlast_img read more

Markets Right Now Stocks sink as trade war escalates

NEW YORK — The latest on developments in financial markets (all times local):9:35 a.m.Stocks are plunging at the open on Wall Street Monday after China announced retaliatory tariffs against goods from the United States.China plans tariff hikes on $60 billion of U.S. imports after the Trump administration on Friday raised tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports from 10% to 25%.Technology, industrial and consumer-focused companies are bearing the brunt of the losses. Apple is down 4.4% while Caterpillar is off by 4%.The Dow Jones Industrial is down 470 points, or 1.8%. The S&P is dropping 51 points, or 1.8% and the tech-heavy Nasdaq is down 2.3%.Oil rose 2.4% to $63.15 a barrel after two Saudi vessels were targeted off the coast of the United Arab Emirates.The Associated Press read more

Facebook may be slapped with a recordsetting fine from US regulators over

WASHINGTON – U.S. regulators have met to discuss imposing a record-setting fine against Facebook for violating a legally binding agreement with the government to protect the privacy of its users’ personal data, according to three people familiar with the deliberations but not authorized to speak on the record.The fine under consideration at the Federal Trade Commission, a privacy and security watchdog that began probing Facebook last year, would mark the first major punishment levied against Facebook in the United States since reports emerged in March that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy, accessed personal information on about 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge. Instagram’s digital ad share to double despite Facebook issues Mark Zuckerberg says he’s going outside his comfort zone in 2019 to host regular discussions on tech Samsung phone users get a shock: They can’t delete Facebook The penalty is expected to be much larger than the US$22.5 million fine the agency imposed on Google in 2012. That fine set a record for the greatest penalty for violating an agreement with the FTC to improve its privacy practices.The FTC’s exact findings in its Facebook investigation and the total amount of the fine, which the agency’s five commissioners have discussed at a private meeting in recent weeks, have not been finalized, two of the people said. Facebook also has talked with FTC staffers about the investigation, one of the people familiar with the probe said, but it is unclear whether the company would settle with the FTC by accepting a significant financial penalty.The FTC, which has been shut down amid the lapse in government funding, could not be reached for comment. FTC Chairman Joseph Simons did not respond to a request for comment. Facebook declined to comment.The Washington Post read more