2007 CANBERRA CUP COMMENCES TODAY

first_imgThe Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Touch Association is hosting the 3rd Annual Canberra Cup this weekend from 2-4 November 2007 at the Deakin playing fields.Canberra’s biggest event on the touch calendar has attracted 19 teams from South Australia, Wagga Wagga, Wollongong, Sydney, and Dubbo.ACT Touch Association President Colin Spence believes the Canberra Cup is a fantastic opportunity to showcase touch football in the ACT. “With all of the local talent and a number of international touch representative and National Rugby League players paticipating, it is bound to be a top class spectacle and very worth while for anyone interested in coming to Deakin to check it out,” Spence saidOne of the most anticipated clashes of the tournament will be the match between Vawdon Cup  big guns Western Suburbs and Canberra City 2. The Western Suburbs team comprises several current New South Wales and 2007 Australian World Cup representatives, while the Canberra City 2 attack is led by St. George-Illawarra halfback, Jamie Soward.Australian Men’s Open World Cup representative Matt Curran, captain of local hopes the Woden Eagles, is looking forward to the opportunity to play against some of the best players in the world.“It’s going to be a great chance to play against some quality opposition. Some of the teams that are coming down have a few internationals in their side, and it will be great to test ourselves against them.” Curran said.With so many teams visiting from other states ACT Touch Game Development Officer, Chris Tarlinton has labelled the event as an “invaluable experience for our local players.”“To have the New South Wales and Australian players here add another dimension to the competition. It is a perfect opportunity for our local stars to play with and against players they can learn enormously from,” said Tarlinton.Teams will be battling it out this weekend in the Men’s and Women’s Open divisions, as well as the Social Mixed division.Grand Finals wil be played on Sunday 4 November 2007 with the showcase Open Grand Finals in Women’s at 2.30pm, and the Men’s Final at 3.30pm.last_img read more

a month agoFiorentina boss Montella left frustrated by Atalanta collapse

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Fiorentina boss Montella left frustrated by Atalanta collapseby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFiorentina boss Vincenzo Montella was left frustrated with their 2-2 draw against Atalanta.The Viola were 2-0 up against Atalanta, but allowed a comeback to 2-2 in the final seconds of the match.“We played against Napoli, Juventus and Atalanta, so the top three from last season, and we played very well against all of them,” Montella told Sky Sport Italia.“We deserved something more from all of those games, so we should be given credit for an incredibly tough opening few rounds.“If we are able to force a side like Atalanta to score at the last second for an equaliser, it means we are not doing badly. I won’t sleep tonight, but at the same time I have to look at the overall journey of this Fiorentina team and say we are on the right track.“It’s very complicated once it gets to the final seconds and I was forced into some substitutions by fitness problems. We know Atalanta are so good at comebacks.“I have to look at the positives, as the team was solid for most of the game.” last_img read more

a month agoRochdale midfielder Rathbone excited to face former club Man Utd

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Rochdale midfielder Rathbone excited to face former club Man Utdby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveRochdale midfielder Oliver Rathbone is looking forward to facing his former club Manchester United in the Carabao Cup third-round on Wednesday.22-year-old Rochdale was part of the United academy until leaving for the Dale in 2016.”It’d be incredible,” said the midfielder. “It’s always been my dream to play at Old Trafford and I spent lots of years at the club aiming to do that – that was always the end goal.””My path has taken me on a different route, which has been a great learning curve, so to come back and play with this team would be very special.” last_img read more

Johnny Bower was a fearless competitor and a fan favourite with Maple

first_imgTORONTO – Johnny Bower didn’t really want to come to Toronto. But the pint-sized goalie with the big heart went on to become part of Maple Leafs lore.Bower, a two-time Vezina Trophy winner who helped the Leafs win their last Stanley Cup championship in 1967, died on Tuesday. A statement from his family said the 93-year-old died after a short battle with pneumonia.Bower, who became known as the China Wall, was happily playing in the minors in Cleveland when he was picked up by Toronto almost 60 years ago. He said he only showed up to avoid being suspended for not reporting.“They just wanted me for one year but I had a good team in front of me,” Bower recalled with a laugh in a November 2014 interview. “I was there for 13 years, so it turned out really nice for me.”Years after retiring, Bower remained one of the most beloved ex-Leafs.“I don’t know what it is,” he said of his popularity.But Bower, whose age seemed flexible during a long hockey career that took a long while to come to a boil, always had time for his fans.“I can’t say no to these kids. Because when I was a child during Depression time we had nothing at all. Like my dad said it costs you nothing for a smile. Just go ahead and work and do your job and be good to people and they’ll be good to you.”Toronto honoured Bower on the occasion of his 90th birthday on Nov. 8, 2014, during a game against the New York Rangers, his first team. He was given a framed, autographed crest from each team and an enthusiastic rendition of “Happy Birthday” from the sellout crowd.“There may not be a more loved Toronto Maple Leaf nor a former player who loved them as much back,” Maple Leafs president and alternate governor Brendan Shanahan said in a statement.Bower’s career took off after the Leafs claimed him in a 1958 intra-league draft. Bower went on to play 475 regular-season games and win four Stanley Cups for the Leafs, plying his trade mostly without a mask.“I got a couple hundred stitches in the face,” the fearless goaltender recalled during a 2005 interview. “You learn how to duck.”Just five foot nine, Bower was named to the NHL’s first all-star team in 1961 and won the Vezina Trophy as best goalie that year, too.He pioneered the poke-check, diving head first at opposing players to knock the puck off their sticks. The move came with a cost — he suffered cuts and lost teeth by throwing himself into the action.But he stopped pucks. And he got better with age — despite painful bouts with arthritis and eventually learning he was near-sighted.Bower won the Vezina Trophy in 1961 and the Leafs hoisted the Stanley Cup in 1962, 1963, 1964, with Bower and Terry Sawchuk sharing the Vezina in 1965. In 1967, again sharing the job with Sawchuk, he helped Toronto win its last title at the age of 43.He usually wore a mask for practices but didn’t use one in games until his second-last NHL season, 1968-69. That spring, he became the oldest goaltender to appear in a Stanley Cup playoff game at 44 years four months and 28 days.“He was an inspiration to us,” said George Armstrong, who captained the Leafs’ last championship team. “He shamed others into hard work.“John gave everything he could during workouts and we weren’t going to let that old guy show us up.”After retiring, he served as a scout and goalie coach for the Leafs.He was the only boy among nine children in a rural Saskatchewan family by the name of Kiszkan. He loved hockey and decided he wanted to be a goalie. He made leg pads from an old mattress, and he was on his way.But there was a momentous detour: in 1940 at age 16 he lied about his age so he could enlist in the army and do his bit in the Second World War. He told authorities his birth certificate had burned in a fire.After training in Vernon, B.C., he was stationed in England but did not see action due to arthritis.“It’s a good thing I didn’t because the Germans were right there waiting,” he said. “A lot of guys there were killed on the beaches. I know four or five good hockey players from Prince Albert who were killed. They never came back.”Upon his return, he played junior hockey with his home-town Prince Albert Black Hawks.Turning pro with the Cleveland Barons in 1945, he changed his name to Bower because he felt Kiszkan was too difficult to pronounce. He played eight seasons in the AHL before getting a chance in the NHL, earning league MVP honours three times.Bower played all 70 games for the New York Rangers in 1953-54, but the team chose to go with Gump Worsley the next year and Bower was back in the minors for most of the next four years.He played 64 games for the AHL Cleveland Barons in 1957-58 before being picked up by Toronto.“I didn’t even want to come to Toronto, to be honest with you because I was 35 years of age at that particular time and I didn’t know I could help them,” he said, further muddying the waters when it comes to his age. “I had the experience, mind you. But I was happy in Cleveland, I enjoyed myself there and had a good job. When they picked me up, I didn’t want to go. And Mr. Hendy (Cleveland GM James Hendy) said at that time if you don’t go, they’ll suspend you.”Bower agreed to go when Hendy said he would have a job waiting for him if it didn’t work out in Toronto.Bower went on to become a blue-and-white fixture. He finally retired after playing one game in the 1970-71 season — four months past his 45th birthday.He played 552 regular-season NHL games with 250 wins, 195 losses and 90 ties. He posted 37 regular-season shutouts and had a goals-against average of 2.52. Combining his AHL and NHL appearances, he was in a total of 1,207 regular-season games — a record no goalie will come close to.“There is so much to appreciate in Johnny Bower’s accomplishments on the ice — including the four Stanley Cups and membership in the Hockey Hall of Fame — and yet there was so much more to the man who served his sport, his country, and his community with such distinction,” said NHL commissioner Gary Bettman.He almost made a comeback in 1980. With Leaf goalies Mike Palmateer and Paul Harrison sidelined by the flu and a question-mark over whether Vincent Tremblay could make it in time from the AHL, Bower signed a one-game contract as an emergency backup.Tremblay made it on time, so Bower’s services weren’t needed.Bower was always coy about his age and, when asked about it upon his retirement, he said, “If you don’t know by now, you never will.”Punch Imlach, coach of those championship teams, marvelled at Bower’s courage.“Nobody ever, anywhere in sports, had more guts than Bower,” said Imlach.Bower was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1976. Toronto paid tribute to him with a commemorative banner in 1995 that still flies high at the Air Canada Centre, and his old AHL team in Cleveland retired his No. 1 in 2002.Like other Toronto fans, Bower was forced to endure the Leafs’ long Cup drought.“It hurts a little bit inside but I mean they’re trying.” he said in 2014. “They have a pretty good young club team right now going but it’s going to take a time to develop.“It’s frustrating. At times there I don’t watch the game if they’re getting beat. But other times I watch it pretty closely. I keep an eye on the goalkeeper more than anybody else.”In his free time, Bower loved fishing at his cottage near Bobcaygeon, Ont. In his later years, he was involved in numerous charity causes and made appearances for the Leafs, always to warm applause.Note to readers: This a corrected story. The previous version incorrectly referred to when Bower was acquired by Torontolast_img read more

Cenovus agrees to sell Saskatchewan enhanced oil recovery assets to Whitecap

first_imgCALGARY – Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE) says it is selling its majority stake in a Saskatchewan enhanced-oil recovery project to Calgary-based Whitecap Resources Inc. (TSX:WCP) for $940 million.The deal is the last on a list of four asset sales the major oilsands producer vowed to complete to help pay for its $17.7-billion acquisition of most of the Canadian assets of Houston-based ConocoPhillips earlier this year.It has previously agreed to sell its Palliser assets in southeastern Alberta to Torxen Energy and Schlumberger for $1.3 billion, its Suffield operations in southern Alberta to International Petroleum Corporation for $512 million and its Pelican Lake heavy oil assets in northern Alberta for $975 million to Canadian Natural Resources (TSX:CNQ).Incoming Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix says in a statement that the sale will allow the Calgary company to retire the entire $3.6-billion bridge facility associated with the ConocoPhillips purchase before year-end.Cenovus has said it will identify other assets for sale this year to take the total raised to between $4 billion and $5 billion.In a separate release, Whitecap says the purchase of Cenovus’s 62 per cent interest in the Weyburn, Sask., project will boost its overall production in 2018 by about 25 per cent to about 74,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day.The Weyburn project has been in operation since 1954. Cenovus began injecting carbon dioxide into its oil-producing underground formations in 2000 to enhance oil production and extend the life of the field.last_img read more

Luxury home sales drop 35 in Toronto and Vancouver highend condo sales

first_imgTORONTO – Sales of luxury homes in two of Canada’s most expensive cities fell this year, as the high-end real estate market continued to feel the impact of foreign buyers taxes.Realty brokerage Re/Max says sales of single-detached homes priced from $1 million to $2 million fell 35 per cent from a year ago in both Toronto and Vancouver.According to the annual report, released Tuesday, sales of single-detached homes in the $2-million-to-$3-million range were down 50 per cent in Toronto and 22 per cent in Vancouver.Meanwhile, homes that were sold for more than $3 million dropped 44 per cent in Toronto and 45 per cent in Vancouver.Re/Max says homebuyers have been grappling with the introduction of foreign buyers taxes in Ontario and B.C., along with increased property transfer taxes and school taxes on B.C. homes over $3 million.“All the new rules that the government implemented, along with the foreign buyers tax and the new lending regulations, it all just put a crunch on the most expensive part of the market,” said Christopher Alexander, executive vice-president and regional director of Re/Max Integra’s Ontario-Atlantic business.He says luxury homeowners may have also been hesitant to list this year amid signs that the country’s housing market may be cooling, choosing instead to “wait it out.”Although luxury home sales are weakening, sales in the low-end of the luxury condo market saw increases driven mainly by millennials who are using their inheritances and baby boomers looking to downsize, the report said.Alexander says condos appeal to baby boomers because they can get more value for their money, especially in the major cities.“Most of them have put all their kids in school. They don’t need so much space anymore. Their single-detached home is worth a fortune and now they can buy a really nice luxury condo that is not as big in a really great urban area where they have access to a more urbanized lifestyle, more action,” he said.“Luxury is not just about price. A lot of it has to do with pedigree. If you buy with a million in Toronto or Vancouver, it doesn’t get you a luxury home but if you get a suite in the Four Seasons or the Shangri-La or the Ritz-Carlton. You’re going to get a small condo in a luxury building with all the luxury amenities. You’ve got that pedigree piece that is appealing to the higher end of the market.”The report says condo sales in the $1-million-to-$2-million range were up two per cent year over year in Toronto and six per cent in Vancouver. Calgary saw their condo sales in this price range jump by three per cent, while Victoria sales climbed 19 per cent.The most expensive condominium sold in Toronto in 2018 so far was priced at $11.5 million, topping the $8 million that was paid for the most expensive condo sold in 2017. The priciest condo sold in Vancouver so far this year was $11.7 million, up 34 per cent from the top price of $8.7 million paid last year.Follow @LindaNguyenTO on Twitter.last_img read more

Water restrictions for oil and gas industry have been implemented by the

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – All previously approved water diversions under Section 10 of the Water Sustainability Act are immediately suspended by the BC Oil and Gas Commission (BCOGC), due to drought conditions.Peace River Watershed: Alces River Beatton River (Doig River, Osborne River, Blueberry River) Farrell Creek Cache CreekTributaries to the Kiskatinaw River (but does not include the Kiskatinaw River) Liard River Watershed:  Fontas River  Kantah River  Petitot River  Gutah Creek  Hay RiverThe suspension does not apply to the main channel of the Peace River or Dinosaur Lake and the diversion and use of water stored in dugouts or dams are not suspended.Water levels are anticipated to continue dropping until significant rain falls in the area. The Commission will assist industry in identifying options for alternative short-term water supply should it be required during this period of drought. Low streamflow conditions are escalating concerns for impacts to fish, aquatic resources and community supply in the above basins.More information can be found on the B.C. Government Drought Information page; CLICK HEREApplications for water diversion:Given local variability, it is possible some streams in the areas under suspension will have recovered sufficiently to allow some water withdrawal. The Commission will review new applications for diversion, or requests to use existing approvals, on a site-specific basis.Operators are requested to do the following to support their application or request to use an existing Section 10 approval: 1. Limit the application to water volumes and points of diversion that are realistic to the specific operational needs for the upcoming months.2. For new applications for diversion for water from rivers and streams, or to request use of existing approvals, provide a good discharge measurement at the point(s) of diversion, to provide information on current flow conditions in relation to the volume of water requested. The discharge measurement will be collected to an acceptable hydrometric standard by a qualified individual.3. For new applications for diversion from lakes, or reactivation of existing approvals, provide information on lake bathymetry:a. Surface area (hectares).b. Depth (metres). If lake depth information is not already available from provincial databases or previous surveys, obtain depth measurements at points along two transects representing the long and short lake axes, to determine maximum lake depth.c. Volumelast_img read more

Sporting beyond the field

first_imgThere have been plenty of controversies lately regarding the Indian cricket team wearing camouflaged Army caps to show solidarity with the martyrs of the recent Pulwama terror strike during the ODI against Australia in Ranchi. On the other hand, the 2018/19 Ranji Trophy champions Vidarbha playing the 2018/19 Irani Cup against Rest of India (ROI) in Nagpur also expressed solidarity with the slain soldiers. On Day 4 of the ongoing game, the Vidarbha cricketers wore black armbands to protest the Pulwama attack. The ROI batsmen Hanuma Vihari and Ajinkya Rahane also joined them. Thus, in perspective, the sports field has always been used to make bigger political statements. The 2009 attack on Sri Lankan cricketers when a bus carrying the team was fired upon by 12 gunmen near Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore was a one-off incident when the world learnt that sportsmen were not out of the terrorists’ radar. Before the cricketing fraternity could realise the consequences, Pakistan plunged into the abyss of isolation. The black armband protest by Zimbabwean cricketers Andy Flower and Henry Olonga during the 2003 cricket World Cup to “mourn the death of democracy in Zimbabwe” drew attention from far and wide. Flower and Olonga were eventually forced to leave Zimbabwe. They later settled in the UK. This political unrest also led to unwillingness from foreign countries to play cricket in Zimbabwe. Australian Prime Minister John Howard expressed concerns for the Australian cricket team playing thereafter he led the charge to throw out Zimbabwe from the Commonwealth of Nations for their land seizure programme resulting in the death of many white Zimbabwean farmers. England forfeited their opening game in Zimbabwe at the 2003 World Cup as a sign of opposition to the regime. The Black Power salute photo, one of the most influential protest images of all time, was captured when US sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos stepped onto the world stage during the Summer Olympics in Mexico City in 1968 and raised their gloved fists in a human rights protest during their medal ceremony. The image became an iconic picture of the Black Power movement and an emotional reference for NFL players who kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality. On October 31, 1984, India abandoned the rest of the tour with Pakistan when they learnt that former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi had been shot dead. There are numerous such examples throughout history when the sporting arena has been used as a platform for silent protest and drew the attention of the world. India, like many other countries, has had its share of political instances in sports as well. Such efforts to disassociate politics from sports are, therefore, outrageously pointless, owing to the kind of passion and enthusiasm it generates in this country, let alone the impact it creates as the most decent and favourable form of dissent.last_img read more

Two IAF personnel killed in road accident near Awantipora base

first_imgSrinagar: Two IAF personnel including a squadron leader were killed and as many others suffered injuries in a road “accident” early Thursday near the Awantipora Air Force station in Jammu and Kashmir’s Pulwama district, a defence official here said. “Four IAF personnel met an accident this morning at Malngpora in Awantipora. Two of the injured personnel succumbed to injuries,” the official said, without giving any further details. The deceased personnel are Squadron Leader Rakesh Pandey and Corporal Ajay Kumar, according to the official. The injured personnel — an officer and an airman — have been shifted to a hospital for treatment, the official added. The Indian Air Force will conduct an inquiry into the incident, he said.last_img read more

Boeing 737 Max 8 woes crimp Asian airlines growth plans

first_imgSingapore: Asian airlines are cutting routes, revamping their schedules and leasing extra aircraft to fill gaps left by the grounding of Boeing 737 Max 8s after deadly crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people. So far, regional carriers have managed to avoid major disruptions, but analysts expect that idling the Max 8s, a fuel-efficient update of Boeing’s popular 737, will crimp growth plans in the near future. As investigations into the crashes continue, Boeing anticipates a $1 billion increase in costs related to the 737 Max, including fixing software implicated in the disasters, adding pilot training and compensating airlines and families of crash victims. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraInvestigators are examining the role of flight-control software that pushed the planes’ noses down based on faulty sensor readings. Nearly 400 Max jets were grounded at airlines worldwide in mid-March after the Ethiopia crash. In Asia, where air passenger traffic is growing the fastest, the groundings are pushing airlines’ costs higher at a time of rising fuel prices, squeezing carriers’ profits. Chinese airlines had 96 Max 8 jets but have managed to avoid massive cancellations by swapping in other models of aircraft, said Kelvin Lau of Daiwa Capital Markets in Hong Kong. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 days”However, this may limit their capacity growth for the coming peak season,” he added. China Southern Airlines, which has 25 Max 8 jets, will likely revise its targeted growth for passenger capacity, he said. Indonesian carrier Lion Air, whose Flight 610 disappeared into the sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta, killing 189 people, said Friday in a statement that it was “operating normally by minimizing the impact” from the grounding of its 10 Max 8 jets. “Lion Air continues to serve routes that have been operated by Boeing 737 MAX 8 by replacing them using other Lion Air fleets,” spokesman Danang Mandala Prihantoro said in a statement. India’s SpiceJet has said it would lease 22 Boeing 737-800NG aircraft, nine of which are already in service. The carrier said it also will deploy five Bombardier Q400 aircraft. “The new inductions will not just bring down flight cancellations to nil but also help in SpiceJet’s aggressive international and domestic expansion plans,” chairman and managing director Ajay Singh said in a statement. Not all carriers, even those without Max 8s, have managed as well. Budget carrier Scoot, which is owned by Singapore Airlines, announced that it would suspend services between Singapore and four cities, with the first suspension starting from June. The routes were served by the Airbus A320. Scoot, which does not have any Max 8 jets, said in a statement that the cuts were “due to a combination of weak demand and a shortage of aircraft resources.” “The aircraft shortage is arising as SilkAir, due to the grounding of its Boeing 737 MAX 8 fleet, will no longer transfer its Boeing 737-800NG aircraft to Scoot in the financial year 2019/2020,” it said. SilkAir, the regional arm of Singapore Airlines, withdrew its six Max 8 jets from service on March 12, and its parent carrier has reassessed its capacity and fleet, opting to have Scoot grow more slowly, said Brendan Sobie of aviation consultancy CAPA. Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg recently said the company was nearly finished an update to the Max that “will make the airplane even safer.” But given the concerns that deepened with the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 on March 10, it’s unclear when the update will be deployed and how long it will take for aviation regulators and airlines to decide it’s safe for the aircraft to resume operations. That’s a hardship for carriers, especially during the peak summer travel season. “Airlines don’t know exactly when the Max will be back in service. This makes it a little difficult to plan, even though there is some flexibility within their fleets,” Sobie said.last_img read more